12.14.13 Training Session (1)

Workout 
Medicine Ball Tosses (5 minutes)
Then:
2×5 Shoulder Dislocates
2×3 Reverse Dislocates
2×10 Squats
2x (5x Burpee + 15m Bear Crawl) 
2×5 Tuck Jump
Then:
Find the right weight for Floor Press (12-13RM)
Then:
10-1 Floor Press Ladder @ 185/95 + 
60m Goblet Carry @ 60-70/40-50# KB in between each set 
Then: 
10-1 “Strict” Push-up Ladder 
30s Dead Hang in between each set
Then:
12-minute AMRAP
Russian KBS (chest height) + Box Jump
Climb the ladder as high as possible (1,1, 2,2, 3,3, 4, 4, etc.)
Record total reps
Then:
Cool Down with stretching something you know is tight (5 minutes total).
 
Participants
[gp_workout1]
 
Coach’s Comments
Here are my five reasons to test structural balance. If you’re unsure what structural balance is, you’ll learn more about it in the coming weeks. Suffice it to say, it’s an evaluative process for determining strength ratios between specific muscles. 
 

1. For optimal athletic performance it is important to address specific ratios of strength imbalances. Structural balance tests those ratios in a way that is proven, reproducible, and objective.

2. If you have plateaued in a lift (or even in general) structural balancing testing identifies weaknesses in stabilizers that could be robbing you of strength gains. In other words, if you’re failing to make progress in a given lift, the body is protecting itself from injury by neurally inhibiting strength gains.

For example, a weakness in external rotation can inhibit pressing strength.

3. Maximize strength while reducing injury. What good is being strong if you’re injured all the time? Correcting strength deficits improves joint health and lowers your incidence of injury.

4. Orient your training. If you fail to plan you are planning to fail. Knowing what areas of your physical development are weak or underdeveloped and how to ‘bring them up’ will help you program more specifically.

5. Motivation. Any time you know where you are, what you have to work on, and how to address it, the athlete’s training drive , adherence to the program, and motivation improves.

Photos

This guy is Luke Leaman, He is the new instructor for BioSig. Everytime he spoke I learned something. Thank you Luke. I'll be back some time next year to take BioSig II.

This guy is Luke Leaman, He is the new instructor for BioSig. Everytime he spoke I learned something. Thank you Luke. I’ll be back some time next year to take BioSig II.