8.14.14 Training Session (1)

Workout 
400m Jog Matrix, mix it up
Then:
2×5 Tempo Squats
2×10 Jump Squats
2x15m Lunge + 15m Broad Jump
Then:
“Death By” KB Shuttle @ 45/30#
1st minute shuttle 15m
2nd minute shuttle 30m 
3rd minute shuttle 45m
Complete 10 minutes, adding 15m each minute
Then:
Run 200m +
20x Jumping Back Squats @ 45# +
10x Whip Smash 
5 rounds each for time. 1:1 Rest
Rest completely after 5 rounds
Then:
500m-400m-300m-200m-100m Row/Ski 
1:1 rest or rest the time it takes your partner to go
During “rest” from 500m perform 20x Wall Ball @ 20/14# 
During “rest” from 400m perform 15x Wall Ball 
During “rest” from 300m perform 10x Wall Ball 
During “rest” from 200m perform 5x Wall Ball 
After the 100m perform Max Reps UB
Then:
Cool Down with Mobility Work
 
 
If your ‘Why’ strong or weak?
The subject of quitting and commitment is one that fascinates me. 
 
Why do some people surge ahead during moments of difficulty while others quit or make excuses?
 
For example, Navy Seal training begins with over 200 men and is down to just under 30 by the end of the first week. Almost 70% of the field decided the training was beyond the sacrifice they were willing to make; too hard; or ‘not worth it’. I can imagine why. If there is even the faintest shred of doubt as to why they are there or the purpose they are pursuing then it’s easy to find  a back door. For those who have clarity and have confirmed their “why” the decision to do whatever it takes to be successful is always worth it because it’s perfectly in line with what we want. 
 
It’s the same when it come to deciding to get fit, strong, or healthy. If your “why” isn’t strong enough your commitment will wain as soon as it gets tough or challenging. I see this weekly in our facility. When I sit down with prospective clients during their evaluation and ask them why they are here I can usually tell who will be around for a while and who will quit based solely on their answer or tone. 
 
My advice. Get really really clear on your “why.” Because if it’s strong enough then it’s impossible to fail. True failure is not knowing why you’re doing something and floating aimlessly from one soft pursuit to the next. Missing on something you really want provides information to fine tune your approach and learn. 
 
Is your ‘why’ strong or weak?
 
Photos
Failure should always be an option. Because if you're not failing you're failing.

Failure should always be an option. Because if you’re not failing you’re failing.