8.19.14 Training Sessions (3), Tag Team

Workout 1, General Preparation
400m Walk/Jog Matrix
Then:
1-10 Box Jump Ladder warm-up
Then:
7x KB Hi-Pull @ 60# +
5x KB Hi-Pull @ 70# +
3x KB Hi-Pull @ 80-90# +
30s ALL-OUT Ski
Rest while partner goes
4 rounds each
Rest 5 minutes
Then:
7x Ball Slam @ 30# +
5x Ball Slam @ 40# +
3x Ball Slam @ 50# +
30s ALL-OUT Row
Rest while partner goes
4 rounds each
Rest 5 minutes
Then:
5x Man-Maker @ 2×30# +
3x Man-Maker @ 2×40# +
2x Man-Maker @ 2×50# +
30s ALL-OUT Airdyne
4 rounds each
Rest 5 minutes
Then:
Cool Down
 
 
Workout 2, Strength
Prep T-Spine and Shoulders
Then:
Snatch BB Complex, 2 light sets
Then:
5x OHS +
1x Rope Climb + 
10x Strict Toes-to-Bar
1:1 Rest, 4 rounds
Then:
BB Bent-Over Row + 3x Strict Pull-ups, various grips
10/3
8/3
6/3
2x (3/3)
Then:
Cool Down
 
 
Workout 3, Power
20x Balancing Leg Swings
2×5 Tempo Squats
2×5 Explosive Jump Squats
2x15m Lunge + Broad Jump
2×5 Tuck Jumps
2×5 Knee Jumps @ BW
4×15 Banded KBS @ 40#, purple band
Then:
4x (20s Slideboard Mountain Climbers + 10s Rest)
Rest 2:00 minutes
4x (20s Slideboard Runner’s Bridge + 10s Rest)
Then:
5x60m Prowler Push 
3:1 Rest
Then:
3x20s BB Jump Squats w/chains
Then:
Cool Down
 
 
Coach’s Comments
I wrote this almost three years ago. It rings truer now than ever before. If you want to get stronger, more fit, or in the best shape of your life make recovery a priority. It should receive as much focus and attention as training. You can only run head first into a wall for so long. 
 
Nutrition and recovery are more than half the battle.  
 
As I mentioned earlier, an effective training program must impose mental and physical challenges. Teaching the athlete to cope with various types of training stress and recover properly is the future of athletic performance in my opinion. As athletes become more sophisticated so too must recovery techniques. Our athletes train hard. They push beyond their physiological and psychological norms. In addition, they experience other professional, personal and social stressors that increase the overall stress load. To overcome this, and ultimately reach a new level of performance, understanding how to best adapt and recover takes precedence. 
 
Recovery is a complex process that deserves as much attention as training itself.  Few have the discipline to rest. The misconception is that if you’re not training you’re not getting better. Nothing could be further from the truth. When we train hard we must rest harder, as adaptations do not occur during training, they occur during rest. Too little rest and/or poor coping strategies and the athlete can dig themselves into a hole, quickly.
 
Our solution to overtraining is tri-phasic. First the athlete must understand the common signs/symptoms of overtraining (below). As a rule, if they’re not making a 2-4 percent increase in performance in some lift or benchmark workout every month something is off. Secondly, training must be organized to maximize recovery days. Many of our athletes train twice a day 2-3 days a week. The advantage of two-a-days is it allows for upwards of six training sessions a week with four full days of recovery verses six days of training with one day to recover.  What athletes do on recovery days is the third phase of recovery. Taking steps to “actively” recover is a more proactive approach that accelerates nervous system and tissue healing. Of course these methods are well beyond the scope of this article, but I’ve listed a few below. 
 
  • Post-Workout Shake (various combinations of whey, glutamine, glycine). For the carb tolerant athlete a high-glycemic carb is added to the PWO shake.
  • Additional supplements may include: various forms of magnesium, taurine, BCAAs, phosphatidylserine, fish oil, primal greens.
  • Massage, stretching, light activity, acupuncture, meditation.
  • Every 6-8 weeks take one week off.
  • Avoiding pro-inflammtory foods like gluten, soy, processed dairy, poor quality meats, tap water, and other processed foods.
In it’s simplest form, recovery can be equated to exercise readiness. A well-rested athlete is ready to train; excited to train; and expecting to perform well in each and every training session.
 
Signs of overtraining are vast. Being able to recognize common signs of overtraining is a good start. I try to educate our athletes as much as possible on the subject.  A few of the more common signs include:
  • Reduced concentration
  • Depression
  • Over-reactivity to stress
  • Poor training drive (i.e. desire to train)
  • Decreased coordination (i.e. especially with more technical movements)
  • Poor sleep, insomnia.
  • An increase in body fat, especially an elevated umbilicus skin-fold.
  • Injuries. Poor healing time.
  • Recovery between sets is longer than normal.
  • Poor grip strength
  • Elevated waking pulse.
  • One-day colds
  • An overall decrease in performance
Train hard. Recover harder!
 
Photos
It's Ball 'Slam', not Ball Drop. So slam the ball and get something out of it.

It’s Ball ‘Slam’, not Ball Drop. So slam the ball and get something out of it.

The KB Hi-Pull is all about the hips. The moment you start using the arms is the moment you're screwed. Brittany wielding the 60# without a problem.

The KB Hi-Pull is all about the hips. The moment you start overusing the arms is the moment you’re screwed. Brittany wielding the 60# without a problem.

We spent some quality time learning how to most efficiently climb a rope this morning so we could use it in the Strength workout. I was delighted that everyone was able to perform is well.

We spent some quality time learning how to most efficiently climb a rope this morning so we could use it in the Strength workout. I was delighted that everyone was able to perform it well, even as fatigue accumulated. Once you learn to save the arms it’s really quite easy.

Putting your child on their stomach is critical to their development. For example, as the child lifts their head they are influencing their spinal curves. The more time they spend prone the better the development of the cervical and lumber spines. They also improve abdominal strength and upper body strength. Do your infant a favor and put them on their stomach as much as possible. They'll cry at first, but it's worth it.

Putting your child on their stomach is critical to their physical development. For example, the simple act of lifting the head and arching the back influences the shape and function of their spinal curves, particularly the cervical and lumber spine. They also improve abdominal strength and upper body strength. Do your infant a favor and put them on their stomach as much as possible. They’ll cry at first, but it’s worth it. Braxton getting a workout watching mom and dad workout. As it should be.

Beau showing good bar position.

Beau showing good bar position.

The Banded KBS adds a tremendous eccentric load. The player has to slam on the brakes in the bottom and accelerate the bell back up.

The Banded KBS adds a tremendous eccentric load. The player has to slam on the brakes in the bottom and accelerate the bell back up.

We prepped the quads with Slideboard Mountain Climbers. They were a nice prelude to the Prowler work to come.

We prepped the quads with Slideboard Mountain Climbers. They were a nice prelude to the Prowler work to come.

Saucy.

Saucy.

The Runner's Bridge is a Hamstring killer.

The Runner’s Bridge is a Hamstring killer.

The proverbial icing on the cake. 3x20s Jumping Barbell Squats with Chains. The chains force the player to fight even harder for acceleration off the ground.

The proverbial icing on the cake. 3x20s Jumping Barbell Squats with Chains. The chains force the player to fight even harder for acceleration off the ground.

Scott trying to find the lock.

Scott trying to find the lock.

 

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