11.10.14 Training Sessions (3)

Workout 1, General Preparation
5 minutes easy Row, Ski, Airdyne, alternate with partner
Then:
15m Lunge + Spider Stretch Combo
2×5 Wall Squats
2x (5x Squat + 5x Jump Squat + 5x Burpee + 5x Tuck Jump) 
2×5 Band Tears
2×10 Shoulder Passes
Then:
12x Alternating Bulgarian Bag Halos + 
30x Mountain Climbers
3 sets to warm-up
Then:
P1 30m Bear Crawl (15m forward, 15 reverse) 
P2 Deck Squat/Ball Slam for the duration of crawls
Switch, 3 rounds each
Then:
10×10 UB Wall Ball AHAP @ 24/20#, tag team style
Then:
Walking KBS Breathing Challenge
15m Walking KBS + 15m Sprint back (w/KB) + 5 Breathes
4 sets @ 70/40
Rest 2:00 minutes
4 sets @ 80/50
Then:
Cool Down 
 
 
Workout 2, Strength (Week 1 of WZA Prep)
5 minutes easy Row, Ski, Airdyne, alternate with partner
Then:
15m Lunge + Spider Stretch Combo
2×5 Wall Squats
2x (5x Squat + 5x Jump Squat + 5x Burpee + 5x Tuck Jump) 
2×5 Band Tears
2×10 Shoulder Passes
Then:
Mobility, T-Spine and Couch Stretch
Then:
15 minutes to establish max Front Squat for day
Then:
Work up to 2RM Chin-up
Then:
4-Rep Chin-up Clusters 
1-1-1-1
Rest 15-20 sec between reps
Rest fully, 3 sets
Then:
3xME Fat Bar Curls, time permitting.
Then:
Cool Down
 
Results
Max FS:
Kian O. – 245
Miguel R. – 225
Jeff B. – 205
Hebah F. – 115
Kathy C. – 120
Diane M. – 135
Kelly W. – 140
Tammi J. – 140
Dana K. – 150
Lelia G. – 105
Shari O. – 125
Robyn S. – 155
Farrah P. – 130
Susan E. – 135
Brooke N. – 165
Brittany R. – 155
Inna M. – 150
Alex N. – 200
Jaime B. – 120
Tabitha B. – 120
 
 
Workout 3, Power (Week 1 of WZA Prep)
Prep shoulder and hips
Then:
Snatch BB Complex @ 45#
Then:
15 minutes to establish a max Snatch for the day
Then:
5×1 @ 90% of day’s max
Then:
15 minutes to establish a max Clean and Jerk for the day
Then:
5×1 @ 90% of day’s max
Then:
3xME HSPUs
Then:
Cool Down
 
Results
Max Snatch, Max CJ:
Inna M. – 80, 
Erin S. – 85, 115
Jen H. – 85, 135 PR
Susan K. – technique
Brittany R. – 110, 135
Coach – 225, 245
 
 
Coach’s Comments
Look for breath control exercises in our warm-ups. I think this is an uncharted, new frontier of strength and conditioning that I’m fascinated by. Breathing, like many exercises, is a skill that can be learned, taught, and improved. I remember late this summer I played with doing some underwater swimming and discovered quickly that my lung capacity and breath control was less than stellar. 
 
Here is a brief write up by Mark Divine on Box Breathing:
 
“Box breathing is meant to be done in a quiet and controlled setting, not while you are in the fight.  The pattern is simply a box, whereby you inhale to a count of 5, hold for a count of 5, exhale to the same 5 count and hold again for 5.  You can start at 3 if this is difficult, or take it up a notch if easy.  You should be uncomfortable on the exhale hold, and be forced to fill the entirely of your lung capacity on the inhale hold.The benefits of deep diaphragmatic box breathing include:

  • Reduction of performance anxiety
  • Control of the arousal response
  • Increasing brain elasticity – flexibility through enhanced blood flow and reduced mental stimulation
  • Enhancing learning and skill development
  • Increasing capacity for focused attention and long term concentration

Breathe control is obviously useful during workouts. But you can even use it throughout the day.  It is great to do before a meeting, while driving, or now, while you are reading this

Anytime you’re stressed you will not want to hold your breath.  So we turn to what we call a Relaxation breath instead.  In this practice you will drop the hold and just inhale to a count of 5 starting from the diaphragm then filling up the middle of your chest then finally the top as if you are gulping in a final sip of air.  Immediately you will begin to exhale in the opposite manner – starting at the top and ending with a puff to get the air out of the deep recesses of your lungs.  Then you do it again and again.

The relaxation breath is valuable to control the arousal response, calming the body and mind so you can remain in control, focused and present.  If you practice it enough it will eventually become your natural breathing state, providing enormous physical and mental benefits over the long run, such as:

  • Long term anxiety reduction
  • Chronic pain reduction
  • Increased sense of well-being
  • Improved immune functioning
  • Enhanced lung capacity
  • Enhanced body awareness
  • Enhanced control over bodily functions
  • Enhanced sense of presence
  • Increased energy
 
Photos
I'm playing with a cool breathing concept this morning. Perform a 15m Walking KBS and then sprint back with the bell in tow. The athlete only gets four breathes between sets. So, in order to lengthen their rest and avoid hyperventilation they have to learn to breathe calmly as they move, slow their breathe during the rest, and stay in control. Too often we lose control of our breathe and it can spell the beginning of the end.

I’m playing with a cool breathing concept this morning. Perform a 15m Walking KBS and then sprint back with the bell in tow. The athlete only gets five breathes between sets. They have to do four sets in a row. So, in order to lengthen the rest and avoid hyperventilation they have to learn to breathe calmly as they move, slow their breathe during the rest, and stay in control. Too often we lose control of our breathe and it can spell the beginning of the end during circuits and competitions.

When the weight is right this is the outcome I'm looking for.

When the weight is right this is the outcome I’m looking for.