1.2.15 Training Sessions (3)

 

GENERAL PREPARATION
WARM-UP
10x Balancing Leg Swings
10x Glute Bridge Marches
10x Half-Bridges
10x Elbow Taps, 3 sec hold each
2×5 Band Tears
2×10 Dislocates
15m Inchworm to Hollow, hold each hollow for 2-3 sec
15m Lunge + Spider Stretch Combo
Then:
MOBILITY:
T-Spine
Bretzel Stretch
Then:
WORKOUT:
KB Complex:
10x Halos, each
10x ATW, each
10x Figure 8’s
10x Goblet Squats
10x KB Snatch, each
5x Windmill
2x TGU
2 sets, one light, one heavy
Then:
EMOM x 10
7x KB Headcutters + 20x Toe Taps on KB. If you knock it down do 2x Burpees after Toe Taps
Then:
6x Heavy KB Box Step-ups (Farmer’s position) +
20s Box Step-up Hops @ 20″
Rest 2:00, 3 sets
Then:
2x (1-5) Pull-up Ladder (2-3 players)
OR
2x (2-4-6-8-10) Ring Row Ladder (2-3 players)
Then:
Cool Down

 

STRONGMAN TRAINING
120′ Yoke, 5 runs climbing to a max UB
Rest fully between efforts
Then:
Against a 2:00 clock
60′ Keg Carry + 120′ Sprint, max rounds
Rest fully, 3 sets
Then:
Cool Down

 

COMPETITIVE FITNESS
Dynamic Hurdle Warm-up (8-10 minutes)
Then:
5x Hill Sprints:
2x Build-ups
3x All-outs
Then:
120′ Yoke, 4-5 sets climbing to a max UB
Then:
Complete as many rounds and reps as possible in 9 minutes of:
15x Toes-to-Bars
10x Deadlifts (115 / 75 lb.)
5x Snatches (115 / 75 lb.)
Then:
Cool Down

 

COACH’S COMMENTS
I was having this discussion with an athlete earlier today. The question that came up was,”when is it ok to break form during training?” The answer is NEVER. Here’s why, because for 99.9% of us Crossfit or whatever form of athletic practice we have chosen is not how we make a living or put food on our table. So to somehow justify wrecking our back, shoulder, neck or any other joint or soft tissue structure for our ego, one more rep or one second faster time is pure stupidity. Don’t get me wrong, I’m all for working hard. But I’m more for working smart.  

Form breaks for three reason:

1.) You never had proper form and need to spend significant time (somewhere in the neighborhood of 10,000 hours) developing it before you even think about doing anything beyond the learning phase of training. 

2.) You are weak and can only maintain good positions for a short period of time before you simply cannot physically control where your body is in space, or worse, aren’t even aware of where you are in space. In this case, you too need to spend more QUALITY time training and getting stronger before you introduce a time or speed domain to your resistance practice. Stick to simpler, less technical tools to target your aerobic energy system like Rowers, Bikes, Running, Burpees, etc.

3.) You are skilled, athletic, and have a broad training background that extends beyond ten years of experience. The answer is still NEVER because as I mentioned earlier, training or sport for 99.9% of us should be about longevity not 15 minutes of fame or a herniated disc. It’s simply not worth it. And besides, if and when you hurt yourself (and you will at some point if you keep ego lifting or training outside your capabilities) then you won’t be able to training at all, which if you’ve ever had to take a lot of time off, you know can drive a man/woman insane. 

Yes, train hard. But also train smart. Wouldn’t it be great to be 60 years old doing Snatches, Pull-ups, Box Jumps, etc. You can if you keep things in perspective, cast your ego to the side, listen to you body, and learn to stay on the right side of the line between risk and reward. 

Much love,
Coach Chris

 

PHOTOS

There's a fine line between pain and pleasure.

There’s a fine line between pain and pleasure.